SHARK FISHING TAMPA

If you’re already starting to wind down your summer activities and get a head start on the fall and school starting back, don’t give up on the exciting summer fishing season just yet. The sharks are still biting in Tampa Bay through August, so it’s definitely not too late to charter your shark fishing adventure with us! Although sharks stick around this area all year long, July and August are the prime months that offer the best chance for your catch. After all, Tampa Bay has some of the most populated shark infested waters in the world this time of year, thanks to the huge amount of aquatic life that live and visit here throughout the year (but don’t let that scare you away from the beaches, we rarely have attacks happen).

Shark Fishing Tampa Bay is a fun, exciting, safe activity for all ages and everyone in the family. Catching Blacktip, Spinner, BonnetHead, Nurse, Hammerhead, and the occasional Bull Shark on the inshore is something you’ll never forget and will remain a fun family story to tell for generations to come. And some types – blacktip and bonnethead in particular – make for some delicious shark steaks at the dinner table later that night. But even if you don’t catch one that makes a good meal, the real fun is trying to land them.

One of the fun things about shark fishing Tampa is that you never know what is swimming in the waters we are fishing. Sometimes the sharks come right up to the boat and chew on the chum bag. We use live baits and chum to entice the sharks to the boat, so you can see them close up when they go for your hook. You have almost as good a chance to see a 15 foot hammerhead as you do a 3 foot blacktip, depending on how far out you venture.

We use heavy duty conventional spinning gear for our shark adventures so that you’re more likely to bring your trophy catch in rather than watch your broken line swimming away. We also use fresh bait. Sharks will strike at lures too occasionally, but the smell of blood and fresh bait really gets their stomachs grumbling. Sharks have the most keen sense of smell in the ocean when it comes to blood, and they can smell it from miles away.

A side benefit of charting a shark fishing trip with Capt. John is that you could catch a wide variety of other fish in the meantime, since the sharks will be hunting them so they will be in the area as well. And when you’re back in the office the next week you can ask your coworker “so what did you do over the weekend?”, and after they tell you about the restaurant where they ate or the family get together at the local park, they’ll inevitably ask you about your own time off. How cool would it be to casually drop “I caught a 500 pound Hammerhead while shark fishing Clearwater”?